1,666,666/1 Football Acca

1,666,666/1 Football Acca  An anonymous Manchester United fan from Lichfield, Staffordshire was, no doubt, disappointed when his team were beaten 3-1 on aggregate by Bayern Munich in the quarter-finals of the UEFA Champions League in 2000/01. However, the same fan had cause for rapturous celebration when ‘Die Bayern’ edged out Valencia 5-4 in a tense penalty shootout at the San Siro in Milan, Italy the following month to become European champions.

In so doing, Bayern Munich completed a 15-fold ante-post accumulator, placed the previous August, which also included the winners of the Premier League, Championship, League One, League Two and National League among various other football, cricket and rugby selections. The accumulator paid an eye-watering 1,666,666/1 – believed to be a world record, in terms of a football-related payout by a British bookmaker – so, for his modest £0.30 stake, the self-employed businessman collected £500,000. Previously, the most profitable football bet in British history was the £400,000 won by Solihull florist Adrian Fitzpatrick, albeit for a much larger stake, at the 1994 World Cup.

It was not the first time that the same punter had won a six-figure sum from the same William Hill betting shop, having previously netted £157,000 for a £2.50 stake when Manchester United won the UEFA Champions League two years previously. At that time, he boldly told betting shop staff, ‘I’m going to do you again’, and so he did. Manageress Janet Dykes, who paid out on both bets, likened his most recent success to ‘winning the Lottery twice’.

The ITV 7

The ITV 7  Nowadays, the ITV 7 is a free-to-play competition offered by ITV in partnership with Sky Bet, but has its origins in the previous incarnation of ITV Racing, shown as part of ‘World of Sport’ from the early Seventies onwards. Although no longer an accumulator in the traditional sense, the basic concept remains the same; viewers are required to predict the winners of all seven selected races to win a prize of up to £100,000. Of course, picking seven winners, especially on a competitive, televised card, is no mean feat and cumulative odds regularly run to tens, or even hundreds, of thousands to one.

The ITV 7 may be free to enter, but the huge number of entries often leads to multiple winners, who share the jackpot prize. Consequently, many punters supplement their promotional bet with a small-stakes accumulator, of the traditional type – that is, settled at starting price, early price or board price, at the discretion of the punter – so that, if they do strike it lucky, they are guaranteed a mammoth payday, regardless of the number of winning tickets in the ITV 7.

However, even so, punters still need to pay attention to the prices on offer from the bookmaker with whom they place their accumulator bet; betting at multiple odds means that a point, or half a point, here and there can quickly translate into a shortfall of hundreds of thousands of pounds in the final payout. Indeed, on Betfair Hurdle Day, 2019, odds comparison service Oddschecker calculated that the difference between the best and worst odds on offer for each of the winners of the ITV 7 races – although, individually, never more than a single point – translated into a deficit of over £375,000 on a 7-fold accumulator to a £1 stake.

10 Fold Premier League Acca

10 Fold Premier League Acca  The final day of the Premier League football season inevitably produces one or two surprise results, as an exhausting campaign takes it toll and players with little, or nothing, to play for have one eye on the beach. The closing round of fixtures in 2018/19 was no exception, with perhaps the biggest surprise of all coming at Old Trafford, where a brace of goals by Cardiff City winger Nathaniel Mendez-Laing saw the already-relegated Welsh club record their first win over Manchester United since 1954.

Elsewhere, some results went according to form. Manchester City and Liverpool both won, against Brighton and Wolves, respectively, to confirm their positions as the top two in the Premier League, while Arsenal won their final game, against Burnley, for the eighth season running, to finish fifth and qualify for the Europa League. Less readily predictable, perhaps, were draws between Spurs and Everton, Leicester and Chelsea and Southampton and Huddersfield.

Nevertheless, all seven results, along with three more, were correctly predicted by an anonymous Derbyshire punter, who staked £5 on a ten-fold accumulator with Paddy Power and duly won £117,485.16 at cumulative odds of 23,496/1. The results may not have taken the punter unawares but, having neglected, for whatever reason, to check the outcome of his bet until ten days later, discovering that he was over £117,000 richer almost certainly. A Paddy Power spokesman likened his windfall to ‘finding a winning lottery ticket down the back of the sofa.’

First Betting Shop Millionaire

First Betting Shop Millionaire  Even back in 2008, fifty pence was less than the price of a loaf of bread, or a pint of milk, but that was the amount staked by Fred Craggs, a fertiliser salesman from Thirsk, North Yorkshire, who would subsequently become the first ‘betting shop millionaire’. The day before his sixtieth birthday, in February, 2008, Craggs placed an eight-fold accumulator on horse races at Sandown Park, Nad Al Sheba, Warwick and Wolverhampton at his local William Hill betting shop. Fittingly, under the floodlights at Gosforth Park that evening, his eighth and final selection, A Dream Come True, won at 2/1 to land cumulative odds of nearly 2,800,000/1.

Craggs remained blissfully unaware of his good fortune until the following day, when he visited another William Hill betting shop in nearby Bedale. Having placed another five bets, each worth fifty pence, as was his custom, he asked staff to check his betting slip from the previous day. Craggs apparently visibly paled when informed that his total winnings were exactly £1,000,000 – subject to maximum payout rules, but nonetheless unprecedented in the history of British betting shops – but later said that he had experienced only a ‘dull sensation of excitement about the win’. William Hill spokesman David Hood was, thankfully, a little more upbeat, saying, ‘It is a staggering bet, and earns him a place in history as the world’s first betting shop millionaire. Even a scriptwriter couldn’t have dreamt this one up.’