Each Way Bet

Each Way Bet  An each way bet has two components to it, firstly a win aspect where you, for instance, back the horse you hope will win a race. The other half of the stake however, goes on the horse being placed (typically the first three places, but its dependent on the size of the field). This type of bet ensures that if the horse doesn’t win, you still have the opportunity to win the place part of your bet. Depending on the odds of your initial selection this could result in you making a profit even if your horse doesn’t win the race.

Tricast Bet

Tricast Bet  Along the same lines of a forecast, a tricast involves picking three selections in a race in the correct order. This type of bet is only available in handicaps of eight runners or more due to the increased likelihood of the event occuring the less horses features in the race.  Aside from a straight tricast, a combination tricast consists of 6 bets, with the three selections needing to finish in any order, 1st, 2nd and 3rd.

12-fold Cricket Acca

12-fold Cricket Acca  ‘Most men pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it’, or so wrote nineteenth-century Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard. However, there was nothing hasty about the punter who placed a year-long 12-fold accumulator on various major sporting events in 2018/19, although his bet did eventually boil down to a rather breathless Sunday afternoon and evening in southwest and northwest London.

By that stage, the intrepid punter had already chalked up ten winning selections, including Europe in the Ryder Cup at 11/10, Liverpool to finish in the top two in the Premier League at 8/11 and MK Dons to finish in the top seven in League Two at 1/3, to name but three. However, on Sunday, July 14, 2019, he still required defending champion Novak Djokovic, at 7/2, to win the Men’s Singles Final at Wimbledon and England, at 5/2, to win the Cricket World Cup Final at Lord’s.

After nearly five hours play, Djokovic finally defeated Roger Federer 13-12 in the fifth and final set after a tiebreak. Over at Lord’s, almost as if the betting gods knew a huge sum of money was at stake – the punter stood to collect £258,000 for his initial outlay of £650 – the agony continued. Set a total of 242 to win outright, England scored 14 runs from their final over and tied the New Zealand score of 241, resulting in a so-called ‘Super Over’ to decide the result. Remarkably, after a further six balls apiece, both teams had scored 15 runs and were still tied.

However, the International Cricket Council (ICC) tournament playing conditions stated that, in the event of a tie, the team that hit the most boundaries during their innings, including the Super Over, would be declared the winner. Thankfully, at least for our punter, England hit nine more boundaries than New Zealand, so became Cricket World Cup Winners for the first time.

Forecast Bet

Forecast Bet  Forecasts consist of picking two selections in the same event. A straight forecast involved picking, for instance, two horses in a race to place first and second, in that order.  A reverse forecast offers a little more wiggle room in that the two horses can finish in either order (AB or BA) and you still win. Lastly, and less popular,  a combination forecast  involves picking three selections, two of which have to place first and second in any order.

If you see a race as being out of two horses, a forecast can be the ideal type of bet, especially if one of them or both are big odds selections.